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Blog post

Yemen: questions about an aid system

The situation in Yemen is often presented as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, long ignored by the media, and requiring assistance vital to the survival of almost the entire country. Cholera outbreaks, famine, and destruction are invoked to support that argument. In reality, however, the situation of the country’s 25 to 30 million inhabitants is impossible to know with any accuracy. Nor do we know exactly what is happening in Yemen in terms of aid, although the amount of funding is very large. Noting these diagnoses and its field teams’ perspective on certain points, Médecins Sans Frontières has launched an effort to better understand this field of action using a quantitative and qualitative approach. A review of aid organisation documents and a series of interviews with aid actors in Yemen – in Houthi areas, in particular – has yielded a number of different conclusions.

The situation of the 25 to 30 M inhabitants in #Yemen is impossible to know with any accuracy. Nor do we know exactly what is happening in terms of aid. @MSF_france has launched an effort to better understand this field of action. @OCHAYemen @WFP_MENA https://t.co/XbvkdapqY9
The 20th anniversary of the @MSF_access In the light of the historical background of the early days of the Campaign, Jean-Hervé Bradol analyses the medico-operational context of the Campaign today and asks the question of its objectives. @MSF_france https://t.co/gN0294FcFX
Il est en impossible de connaître avec précision la situation des 25 à 30 millions d’habitants du #Yemen. Il n’est pas plus aisé de savoir ce qui y est fait en matière d’aide. @MSF_france a entamé un travail destiné à mieux comprendre ce terrain d’action. https://t.co/VFPwDXAvbp
RT @EleanorDavey: This 2012 piece by Rony Brauman @MSF_Crash shows some of the tensions that arise as the Review has become more open to th…
RT @msf_arabic: في هذا الجزء من اللقاء يشاركنا @mikafromparis المزيد من المعلومات حول كتابه الجديد بعنوان "إنقاذ حياة الناس والبقاء على قي…
Yemen, Hodeidah, 1 May 2019 - on the road to Sanaa
Blog post

Yemen: questions about an aid system

The situation in Yemen is often presented as the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, long ignored by the media, and requiring assistance vital to the survival of almost the entire country. Cholera outbreaks, famine, and destruction are invoked to support that argument. In reality, however, the situation of the country’s 25 to 30 million inhabitants is impossible to know with any accuracy. Nor do we know exactly what is happening in Yemen in terms of aid, although the amount of funding is very large. Noting these diagnoses and its field teams’ perspective on certain points, Médecins Sans Frontières has launched an effort to better understand this field of action using a quantitative and qualitative approach. A review of aid organisation documents and a series of interviews with aid actors in Yemen – in Houthi areas, in particular – has yielded a number of different conclusions.

Condition of migrants in Paris
Article

Médecins Sans Frontières-France: tensions arising from the “Migration” projects

In the summer of 2015, the French section of Médecins Sans Frontières started aid projects for migrant populations in Greece and France. The launch of these operations was the occasion for lively discussions within the association, both in terms of public positioning (how to justify an intervention in a rich country and not get lost in "political" territory?), and in terms of revising our operating methods, knowing that the primary needs of migrants were not primarily medical. Some people then recalled the association's militant practices in the 1990s, which were sometimes considered as abuses. By retracing the history of the French Mission, Michaël Neuman seeks to understand, with regard to the migration issue, the complex articulation between operational constraints, political positioning and militant practices.  

Nov Sokah, 61, in consultation with MSF Nurse Counsellor Chor Samang at the MSF Hepatitis C clinic at Preah Kossamak Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 20, April 2017.
Article

Literature review on the evaluation of the quality of care from a patient’s perspective

The study The Patient Perspective of Quality of Care: A Review of the Literature, which we present here was carried out by Hannah Barnett a public health student at George Washington University, intern with CRASH from June to August 2018. This work sums up seventy articles from a variety of disciplines including medicine and public health. It is part of a reflection initiated by MSF a few years ago on medical quality and the patient-centered approach.

Avril 1994. Kigali. Unité d’hospitalisation de l’hôpital MSF-CICR installé dans un orphelinat tenu par des sœurs.
Article

Book Review: Jean-Hervé Bradol and Marc Le Pape, Humanitarian Aid, Genocide and Mass Killings: Médecins Sans Frontières, the Rwandan Experience, 1982–97

This book describes and analyses the work of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in the Great Lakes Region between 1982 and 1997. It explores the everyday, operational and political dilemmas faced by MSF staff in the field and the debates that followed, as they asked themselves: ‘how should we react and what action should we take’ in the wake of mass violence (p. 4). In effect, the authors ask: (how) could MSF prevent itself being manipulated or becoming complicit in the everyday atrocities in the field?

CONFERENCES
& DEBATES

Patents kill patients
Debate

The 20th anniversary of the MSF Access Campaign

Jean-Hervé Bradol
Andrea Bussotti

To address the political, economic and legal barriers to patients' access to life-saving treatments, MSF created, in 1999, the Access Campaign (the Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines). In these videos, Jean-Hervé Bradol, doctor and crash study director, answers questions from Andrea Bussotti (MSF-France Operational Communication Manager). In the light of the historical background of the early days of the Access Campaign, he analyses the medico-operational context of the Campaign today and asks himself the question of its objectives.

View all Conferences & Debates

Publications

Condition of migrants in Paris
Article

Médecins Sans Frontières-France: tensions arising from the “Migration” projects

In the summer of 2015, the French section of Médecins Sans Frontières started aid projects for migrant populations in Greece and France. The launch of these operations was the occasion for lively discussions within the association, both in terms of public positioning (how to justify an intervention in a rich country and not get lost in "political" territory?), and in terms of revising our operating methods, knowing that the primary needs of migrants were not primarily medical. Some people then recalled the association's militant practices in the 1990s, which were sometimes considered as abuses. By retracing the history of the French Mission, Michaël Neuman seeks to understand, with regard to the migration issue, the complex articulation between operational constraints, political positioning and militant practices.  

Nov Sokah, 61, in consultation with MSF Nurse Counsellor Chor Samang at the MSF Hepatitis C clinic at Preah Kossamak Hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 20, April 2017.
Article

Literature review on the evaluation of the quality of care from a patient’s perspective

The study The Patient Perspective of Quality of Care: A Review of the Literature, which we present here was carried out by Hannah Barnett a public health student at George Washington University, intern with CRASH from June to August 2018. This work sums up seventy articles from a variety of disciplines including medicine and public health. It is part of a reflection initiated by MSF a few years ago on medical quality and the patient-centered approach.