A / A / A
Debate

Asylum and exile. A history of the distinction between migrants / refugees

On April 12, at 6.30 pm, we will have the great pleasure of hosting a virtual CRASH conference with political scientist and sociologist Karen Akoka, fresh from her publication in November of “Asylum and Exile. A History of the Refugee/Migrant Distinction" (La Découverte, 2020). The author describes and analyzes the trajectory of OFPRA, the French institution founded in 1952 and responsible for granting refugee status; she provides an insight into how the history of the distinction between migrants and refugees was established in France.

RT @IHSA_studies: Our weekly selection of humanitarian blog posts is out: "Actions to prevent conflict and famine" with posts from @ODI_Gl
RT @PParallele: En librairie aujourd’hui ! “If you think you're strong, come to Lagos. You will know.” #manuwastreet #Nigeria #librairie…
[RAPPEL] Le 12 avril, nous accueillons la politiste – sociologue Karen Akoka lors d’une conférence virtuelle du CRASH. Les questions pourront être posées via un lien Vimeo sur notre site ou via le streaming sur Starleaf. Plus d'infos et les liens⬇️ https://t.co/mlIjAmVmW4
The “disappeared” of Congo-Zaire, 1996-1997. The question of the massacres of Rwandan Hutu refugees in DRC — A reaction from @LePapemarc & Jean-Hervé Bradol to "La traversée. An odyssey in the heart of Africa", a book by Patrick de Saint-Exupéry. https://t.co/KS9g7d27hu
Retrouvez l'intervention de Rony Brauman sur le plateau de @CCeSoir, invité pour dresser un bilan de la crise sanitaire, les vaccins, et le nouveau confinement. https://t.co/Y9d1hwEYix
Rwandan refugees fleeing towards Congo-Zaire, 1994.
Blog post

The “disappeared” of Congo-Zaire, 1996-1997. The question of the massacres of Rwandan Hutu refugees in the Democratic Republic of Congo

There is a new book out by Patrick de Saint-Exupéry entitled La traversée. Une odyssée au cœur de l’Afrique [The crossing. An odyssey in the heart of Africa]. What odyssey? Crossing the Congo (Zaire, later the Democratic Republic of Congo) from Rwanda. The author describes his encounters, the beers he had here and there, the bumpy rides on the back of a motorcycle (to Kisangani), a trip down the Congo River, flying over the dense forest on his way to Mbandaka.

Decontamination activities in Kalunguta health zone, North Kivu province, DRC
Blog post

Ebola and innovation: examining the approach to the Nord Kivu epidemic

This article was first published in March 2020 for the Humanitarian Practice Network. 

Within four months of the first notification of Ebola cases in August 2018, the Nord Kivu (and Ituri) Ebola epidemic had become the second-largest on record. Notwithstanding a rapid and massive mobilisation of resources, the outbreak continued beyond the most pessimistic predictions and the case fatality rate (the proportion of people with the infection who die from it) remained static at 66%. Despite numerous lesson-learning exercises following the Ebola epidemic in West Africa in 2014–2016, and despite the development of new vaccines and treatments, after 3,444 cases and 2,264 deaths it is difficult to claim that outcomes are better this time around.

MSF provides medical assistance in Covid19 centres in Paris and the suburbs.
Blog post

Nursing homes and their ghosts: MSF's experience in France during the Covid-19 health crisis

This article was published in Mouvements magazine on March 24, 2021.

In the early spring of 2020, the humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) launched a mission in nursing homes in the Ile-de-France region, which had been hit hard by the Covid-19 pandemic. After considering the implementation of night-time palliative care, the organization finally decided to provide daytime support to the nursing homes in difficulty. Once the crisis was over in the summer, the MSF teams started offering mental health support to nursing home staff. A look back at this experience on September 28, 2020 with four members of the mission, Olivia Gayraud (project coordinator), Jean-Hervé Bradol (M.D. and CRASH1 member), Marie Thomas (psychologist) and Michaël Neuman (CRASH coordinator).

 

Residents of Al Mishlab, Raqqa returning back home to check their houses and belongings. The houses in Mishlab that still stand are scorched and reduced to piles of rubble, and the streets are full of rubbish and abandoned belongings: cooking pans, broken children’s toys and documents. Shops are burned and looted, and the empty bullet cases underfoot are an indication of the violence of this war.
Article

Humanitarian Field Practices in the Context of the Syrian Conflict from 2011 to 2018

This article was first published in Issue 2, Volume 2 of The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs. 

How can a medical humanitarian organisation deliver emergency assistance in Syria when there is nowhere in the country where civilians, the wounded and their families, medical personnel and aid workers are not targeted? Not in the areas controlled by the government, nor in those held by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) or the different rebel groups. So what action could be taken, and how? Remotely or on site? At the very least, we had to decipher the diverging political and military agendas, and then adapt, persist or sometimes just give up. In this article, I will present the full range of methods used to acquire knowledge and obtain information as well as the various networks used to carry out this venture. I will also show how Médecins Sans Frontières’ operations became a balancing act, punctuated by episodes of adapting to the various difficulties encountered.

José Rodrigues Emergency Unit (UPA) in Manaus, Brazil, where the Covid situation remains critical.
Blog post

What to think, do and say about the Covid-19 vaccination? 

Blog written by Jean-Hervé Bradol, director of studies at the Crash.

Today, in order to obtain supplies of vaccines against Covid-19, there is neither a major difficulty related to price, nor a major obstacle related to intellectual property rules, nor a deficit in bio-medical research. However, these three topics are generally at the heart of MSF's communication in the area of access to medical care for those in most need. Our discourse must therefore evolve.
With the emergence of worrying variants of the virus present in the early stages of the pandemic and, as a consequence, the need to vaccinate on a global scale as quickly as possible, the world is facing a double challenge: biological engineering and ultra-industrial production – “ultra” echoing the need to produce on a global scale in a short period of time.

CONFERENCES
& DEBATES

Asylum and exile. A history of the distinction between migrants / refugees

2021-04-12 16:30:00 2021-04-12 18:30:00 Europe/Paris Asylum and exile. A history of the distinction between migrants / refugees On April 12, at 6.30 pm, we will have the great pleasure of hosting a virtual CRASH conference with political scientist and sociologist Karen Akoka, fresh from her publication in November of “Asylum and Exile. A History of the Refugee/Migrant Distinction" (La Découverte, 2020). The author describes and analyzes the trajectory of OFPRA, the French institution founded in 1952 and responsible for granting refugee status; she provides an insight into how the history of the distinction between migrants and refugees was established in France. MSF CRASH

On April 12, at 6.30 pm, we will have the great pleasure of hosting a virtual CRASH conference with political scientist and sociologist Karen Akoka, fresh from her publication in November of “Asylum and Exile. A History of the Refugee/Migrant Distinction" (La Découverte, 2020). The author describes and analyzes the trajectory of OFPRA, the French institution founded in 1952 and responsible for granting refugee status; she provides an insight into how the history of the distinction between migrants and refugees was established in France.

Tse Lowi IDP Site
Debate

The quantification of needs

Joël Glasman

Combining historical research and ethnographic investigations, the Africanist historian Joël Glasman plunges us into the factory of the homo humanitarianus, the average individual, on the basis of which "needs" and aid projects today are assessed. This conversation took place on December 10th 2020, during a conference-debate at Crash.

View all Conferences & Debates

Publications

Residents of Al Mishlab, Raqqa returning back home to check their houses and belongings. The houses in Mishlab that still stand are scorched and reduced to piles of rubble, and the streets are full of rubbish and abandoned belongings: cooking pans, broken children’s toys and documents. Shops are burned and looted, and the empty bullet cases underfoot are an indication of the violence of this war.
Article

Humanitarian Field Practices in the Context of the Syrian Conflict from 2011 to 2018

This article was first published in Issue 2, Volume 2 of The Journal of Humanitarian Affairs. 

How can a medical humanitarian organisation deliver emergency assistance in Syria when there is nowhere in the country where civilians, the wounded and their families, medical personnel and aid workers are not targeted? Not in the areas controlled by the government, nor in those held by the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD), Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) or the different rebel groups. So what action could be taken, and how? Remotely or on site? At the very least, we had to decipher the diverging political and military agendas, and then adapt, persist or sometimes just give up. In this article, I will present the full range of methods used to acquire knowledge and obtain information as well as the various networks used to carry out this venture. I will also show how Médecins Sans Frontières’ operations became a balancing act, punctuated by episodes of adapting to the various difficulties encountered.

District de Jacobabad, Wasayo, Pakistan. Distribution de nourriture par le CICR à 945 foyers touchés par des inondations.
Article

The invention of impartiality: the history of a humanitarian principle, from a legal, strategic and algorithmic perspective

The principle of impartiality, which is often reduced to a principle of mathematical distribution, was originally coined by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), at that time on a quest for legitimacy. However, reducing impartiality to a resource distribution algorithm strengthens the overarching position held by non-territorial organisations. This is the theory put forward by the author in his latest book.

Deux femmes responsables de matériel MSF en Iran
Article

MSF and kidnappings - the secrets and the dilemmas

On the 31st January, a symposium was held at Sciences Po in support of Fariba Adelkhah and Roland Marchal, researchers at Sciences Po's Center for International Research (CERI) who were arrested in Iran on June 5, 2019. Roland Marchal was released on 20th March 2020 in exchange for an Iranian engineer detained in France. On 6th May Fariba Adelkhah was sentenced to 6 years imprisonment for "propaganda against the political system of the Islamic Republic, and collusion to undermine national security". The researcher was offered conditional release on condition that she terminates her research, but she refused. 

The symposium brought together diplomats, journalists, humanitarians and researchers, with the aim of "nourishing reflection about prisoners and hostages, from a political, legal and ethical point of view". Fabrice Weissman presented the experience of Médecins Sans Frontières in the face of kidnappings.